March Trek: Mt. Daraitan + Tinipak River, Tanay, Rizal 03242016

(Edited with Itinerary and Budget) 

As part of our monthly dose of mountains, this month our group decided to try some challenging treks so we arranged our schedule (March 24, 2016) to Mt. Daraitan which is located at near the border of Tanay, Rizal and General Nakar, Quezon. Since some of us are teachers, doing it on holiday season is not a problem.

March 23, 2016: A day before the hike, we sleep over our friend’s house in Navotas so it will be easy for our service to fetch us. Just like our previous treks, we actually never had a good sleep plus we also have to wake up at around 2am since it will be a long drive to Tanay, Rizal. From 12:00am, we had a short nap then woke up at 2:00am for breakfast and some preparation. It was already 4:00am when we left Manila. We just tried to continue our sleep on the van.

After 3 hours of driving, we arrived at Tanay, Rizal. Along the way, we already saw a lot of awesome view of the mountains near the highway plus the overlooking Sea of Clouds welcomed us just before reaching our destination.

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Zoom in: Looks like a lake but it was a cloud in between the montains.

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What a perfect view to start up our adventure!
Thanks to our Driver for dropping us on the side of the highway when we wanted to catch the beautiful scenic view. Though we are far from it, t’was already overwhelming and one of the best experience (so far) on this trek.

From Tanay, it took us another one hour to reach Brgy. Daraitan. The road was really bumpy, there’s a few cemented part but it was no use since almost all the roads are rocky.

According to my research, the fee for the tricycle to the Brgy. Hall of Daraitan is 100 per person then you have to pass the river through a small boat which cost 10 pesos per person but at this present time, no need for the boat since the locals already made a bridge which can be used by the locals and also for the cars going to the barangay. You just have to pay fees (50 Pesos for 4 wheels) when passing through it. (Quite expensive but it was fine since it was also beneficial for the locals and visitors of their province)

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The view of the small river before going to  Brgy. Daraitan.
Arriving at the Brgy. Hall, we payed for the environmental fee (20 Pesos) and Tour guide (500 for 10 person).

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The team while waiting, since there’s a lot of hikers on the hall.
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Registration at the Brgy. Hall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Kuya Manuel, our tour guide. We did some orientation and prayer before heading up to the summit.
It was a fair weather during our trek so it was a chilling adventure (far off compared to our last which is a rainy and muddy one to Buntot Palos).

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The first part of the trail was all flat but rocky. It wasn’t that hard. A good warm up though.

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MJ having a hard time on trail so we decided to send her on the start of the line so she won’t feel being left since it’s her first time and almost gave up on the first leg of the trek.
Then the rest was all ascending. I guess, it was really a tough climb for beginners (but not impossible though, kudos to MJ for surviving her first trail! πŸ™‚ ) Almost 60 degrees from the ground and there’s no flat surface at all. Honestly, our group didn’t had a hard time achieving the summit, maybe because of our one hell of experience on our last trail in Pangkil, Laguna. We considered it as the hardest one and this is just much easier than that considering that the trail is dry and there’s a lot of hand rails on the way. No slides, no muds and good weather.

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There’s a lot of limestones near the cliff along the trail where you can take pictures and sight seeing the view from and of the mountains.

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His version πŸ™‚
After almost 3 hours of ascending, we already reach the summit! *Yehey! Happy dance* No sweat at all (LOL just kidding haha).

 

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The view of Sierra Madre from the summit.

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The famous limestone and location of photo shoots. (Took me a lot of courage just to sit in this near cliff while the others are standing and posing at the top of this stone, how I wish I’m as strong as that haha)

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The brave ones. πŸ™‚

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The squad at the Mt. Daraitan Summit.
There’s a lot of hikers so we just took some short shots and decided to traverse to Tinipak river.

The easier we got to the summit, it was the the other way around descending. All sweat! Even if it just consumes us almost 2 hours way down to the river, the trail was all slippery. They kept on saying that we are almost there but we haven’t seen any sign or sounds of flowing streams. What added up to the torture was the heat and humid along the way. It was far of different from our way up.

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Ladders made up of woods for easier climbing on the the limestones.
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Still all smiles while passing through cave-like rock formations.
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A big thanks to the locals for maintaining the trails and providing ladders though it will also be a big challenge for those extreme adventure seekers if there are no ladders at all. Maybe they are just considering the safety of the hikers too since most of the rocks has a sharp edges.

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After almost 2 hours of descending, finally we arrived at the Tinipak river!
It is one of must try side trip along Mt. Daraitan plus the Tinipak Cave. We are not able to go to Tinipak Cave because of the number of hikers falling in line just to enter the cave since it is a peak season. (I’m still thinking of going back here just to experience the cave or maybe planning to go somewhere with caves too haha).

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Groufie while enjoying the stream at Tinipak River.
The water was not that cold since the temperature is high and maybe because the number of people dipping on the river. It was not that deep and we just lay down on rocks to have some massage from the course of the water.

Then after some video and picture taking along the water, we decided to head back to the barangay since it’s already 4pm and we still have a long way home.

Here are some more shots of the mountains and limestones at Tinipak River along our way back to the barangay.

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Upon arriving at the Brgy. Hall, we just signed out on their logbook then washed up on comfort rooms (just have to pay 20 pesos for banlaw).

It was a long tiring but experience-worth day for all of us. I can say that Buntot Palos did a great job in preparing us for a harder trek like what we had here in Mt. Daraitan. Though they are two different activities, the first one taught us the significance of safety which we applied on the latter. One thing that I also loved here are the views along the way before reaching the vicinity of Tanay Rizal, overseeing the mountains of Sierra Madre, the sea of clouds and also some ridges and hills beside the highway. It added up on the excitement of hiking and traveling.

May the locals continue in taking good care of its trail and the people maintain its natural beauty. Of course, for every hikers, Leave No Trace!
Mt. Daraitan Traverse to Tinipak River

Itinerary

4:00 am: ETD from Manila (Monumento) 

7:00 am: ETA at Brgy. Daraitan, Register and briefing with the guide. Start ascend.

9:45 am: Midway stop for Lunch

10:00 am: Continue to Summit

10:42 am: ETA at the summit, photo ops and enjoy the view

11:30 am: Descend to Tinipak River

1:40 pm: ETA at Tinipak River, enjoy the water

3:00 pm: ETD from Tinipak, tryk back to Brgy. Hall

3:30 pm: ETA to Brgy. Daraitan, Log-out, wash up and merienda

4:30 pm: ETD from Tanay, Rizal

8:00 pm: ETA to Manila
Budget

400 : Van Rental (RT) 

20 : Registration Fee

50 : Tour guide, 500/10

20 : Wash up

20 : Tryk back to Brgy. Hall

50 : Parking Fee

50: Tulay for 4 wheels

610 : Total Expenses
Optional: 

20 : Cave Entrace

35 : Flash light/ Head lamp rental

 

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